Author Topic: #5 - Orthoptera | Tettigoniidae  (Read 2441 times)

Offline cosmln

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#5 - Orthoptera | Tettigoniidae
« on: Wed, 28 December 2016, 06:08:36 AM »
Hi,

Last Orthoptera for now.
A big Tettigoniidae found on lawn at Gite Moutouchi, 29.january.2016.
Possible to say more?

Thanks!
« Last Edit: Sun, 07 May 2017, 09:41:18 PM by Auke »
Cosmin-Ovidiu Manci
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Offline Auke

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #1 on: Sat, 01 April 2017, 01:55:10 AM »
I got the same species in my photo collection, but as yet only IDed to family level. We'll get a name, some day. I'm sure of that! :) :waiting:

Cheers, Auke

Offline kdjong

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #2 on: Sat, 01 April 2017, 06:14:24 PM »
How about Microcentrum triangulatum? As in https://observation.org/soort/photos/656394

Just a thought...

Smiles,
Klaas
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Offline Auke

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #3 on: Sat, 01 April 2017, 06:38:44 PM »
Well... First, M. triangulatum is a synonym of M. incarnatum. Second, that species does occur in Suriname, but I put very limited trust in the IDs of people who add their observations to websites like observation.org. Third, the distinctive brownish band on the rear of the pronotum and the yellowish band on the sides of the pronotum of your specimen are absent on the specimens in observation.org while the specimen depicted in the Orthoptera Species File is old and has lost all its colour. I wouldn't put a name on it as yet.

Cheers, Auke

Offline kdjong

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #4 on: Sun, 02 April 2017, 04:40:34 PM »
Hi Auke,

I am sorry, I didn't want to imply that I had found the right Orthoptera species. I merely thought it would point cosmln in the right direction, because my experience is that if you don't know where to start looking, the internet is REALLY big. So just narrowing the search was my intention.
I guess I am one of those 'unreliable' users of observation.org, but I think it is a fantastic place and a wonderful peer-reviewed network with a very good forum and a good potential to grow to something really worthwhile. For the Netherlands it already is on full speed, but internationally some work still has to be done, to put it mildly, but I like to think I am contributing to an amazing database, suitable for many many opportunities. Of course, there will always be downsides to such a network, as there are to your forum (no disrespect intended) or any other project trying to support nature lovers in this world.
I think the best 'engine' behind all these initiatives is the willingness of every user to look beyond his/her own observations and/or questions. If you read through the different topics in your forum for example you might 1. already find the answer your looking for or 2. stumble upon a question that you can actually answer or help solving. This is true human nature at work and that's why it's so great that you are doing this and I salute you for it!
It may not be the place to start a discussion on the effectiveness or reliability of fora or databases, but I just thought I had to send something in reply to your trust issues with observation-users  ;)

Kind regards,
Klaas
Klaas de Jong
Vogelsafari's
Texel - the Netherlands

Offline Auke

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #5 on: Sun, 02 April 2017, 07:35:26 PM »
Hi Klaas,

Oops, I took your reply as an answer, where I now understand it wasn't. Sorry. :)

I guess I was a bit harsh in judging observation.org users. But when I look at sites like Facebook, much over half of all users that bother to give an ID to an ID request, call e.g. every mole cricket in the world Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa. But if there is a functional forum attached to observation.org, I may have been to quick with my judgement.  The Netherlands are relatively low in biodiversity, but have an enormous number of people with knowledge about it, so observation.org may be rather trustworthy for the Netherlands as the experts will correct the wrong answers. Down here in the Guianas it's rather the other way around, and when people with more or less knowledge of the Dutch fauna come here, they may easily find themselves high up on the first curve of the Dunning-Kruger effect. It keeps happening to me too, every time I photograph something of a new family. Fortunately I know it happens, so I try to keep myself from being very confident, even if I'm very confident. :duh:

Some of the reasons I've started this forum are bringing experts and laypeople together, so that they hopefully will profit both (the laypeople by getting answers, the experts by winning people over for their causes) and that people will get IDs and info with a reasonable level of trustworthyness. The future will tell if this forum has succeeded to realize that, or that people will view this forum as I viewed observation.org in my previous comment... :-[ ::)

Cheers, Auke
« Last Edit: Sun, 02 April 2017, 11:00:30 PM by Auke »

Offline kdjong

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Re: #5 - Orthoptera
« Reply #6 on: Mon, 03 April 2017, 11:17:39 AM »
Thanx Auke, for this post! We're still on the same page  ;D

The forum behind observation.org is very much like your set-up. People can post questions and anyone can reply, with or without knowledge or experience. The hard thing is to recognize what is right and what is wrong, but the forum is moderated by experts. Furthermore, anyone can react to any observation, helping with the determination.
In the Dutch section, called waarneming.nl, there is even a team of experts that checks as much observations as possible. To start, every observation with a photo attached to it, is carefully reviewed and marked as correct (or not). Checks on regular species without photo are done automatically by the website, based on earlier observations and/or probability on the given location at the given time. Scarce species without picture are reviewed as much as possible, but this is the hardest group of observations to manage. In Dutch we have a proverb "elk meent zijn uil een valk te zijn" (everyone thinks his owl to be a falcon), stemming from the world of falconry, and probably close to the Dunning-Kruger-effect.
Unfortunately the team is not (yet!) strong enough to cover the whole world, since this is already quite an impact on the (voluntary!) team of admins, but I imagine this team of experts to grow (and widen) through the years and I do sincerely hope for future combination of powers/forces with websites like iNaturalist, e-Bird, Ornitho and other data-collecting websites, because in my opinion this will make it possible to review and evaluate huge numbers of observations worldwide, increase knowledge, raise awareness, etc.

Smiles,
Klaas
Klaas de Jong
Vogelsafari's
Texel - the Netherlands